Library Workshop: Complying with the NIH Public Access Policy

May 28, 2010

Below are links for the Complying with the NIH Public Access Policy session held today, May 28th, from 3-4 pm in the Graff Library computer lab.

  • Library guide: Complying with the NIH Public Access Policy — The guide includes the necessary four steps for compliance and also incorporates tutorials, frequently asked questions, and other helpful resources and tools to help you get familiar and manage your compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy.
  • PubMed and PubMed Central: The Difference between a PMID and PMCID — The difference between a PubMed Identifier (PMID) and a PubMed Central Identifier (PMCID) comes down to what the number links to. A PMID is a unique identifier for article citations in PubMed, which is a free database of journal article citations in the biomedical sciences. A PMCID is a unique identifier for the full-text of papers found through PubMed Central (PMC), which is a repository of biomedical and life sciences research. A PMID links you to a citation of an article, while a PMCID links you to the full-text of a paper.
  • Managing Your Compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy and Future Changes to eSNAP — This blog post outlines what is needed to manage your compliance and tie your publications with eSNAP.
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June Dates for the “Complying with the NIH Public Access Policy” Workshop

May 24, 2010

Below are the June dates and times for the Complying with the NIH Public Access Policy workshop. They will be held in the Graff Library computer lab (room capacity: 8 people). Please register here.

  • June 2nd from 10-11am
  • June 10th from 1-2pm
  • June 15th from 2-3pm
  • June 23rd from 9-10am

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy became law in January 2008 and effective on April 7, 2008. It ensures the public’s access to NIH-funded research. The workshop will include a 30-minute presentation with 15 minutes for a hands-on exercise and 15 minutes for questions and/or discussion, and cover the following four steps for complying with the policy:

  • Determine applicability — determine which papers fall under the policy
  • Retain copyright — read the journal publisher’s copyright transfer agreement to make sure you’re able to comply with the policy and deposit the paper to PubMed Central
  • Submit your paper to PubMed Central — there are a number of methods to do this; when the publisher doesn’t do this for free, the library can do it for you
  • Cite using PMCIDs — in biosketches, progress reports, and applications, incorporate the PubMed Central ID into the citations of applicable papers authored by you or that come from your NIH-funded projects

Can’t wait and want to know more now? Take a look at our guide on complying with the NIH Public Access Policy. The guide outlines the necessary four steps for compliance as well as incorporates frequently asked questions and other helpful resources to help you get familiar with the NIH Public Access Policy.

Have questions about the NIH Public Access Policy? Contact Andrea Lynch.

Can’t make it? Contact Andrea Lynch to schedule one-on-one or group sessions that work with your or your group’s availability.


Managing Your Compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy and Future Changes to eSNAP

May 21, 2010

To continue to help you manage your compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy, the Graff Library would like to share with you information about My NCBI, My NCBI’s My Bibliography functionality, and linking your My NCBI account with your eRA Commons account.

In addition, with the July upgrade of NIH Electronic Streamlined Non-competing Award Process (eSNAP), the My Bibliography functionality in PubMed’s My NCBI will replace the eSNAP publication listing in the Personal Profile. Read the eSNAP user guide (page 24 of the document) about this new implementation.

Below are the three steps for enabling this functionality:

  1. Register for My NCBI: My NCBI allows you to save searches, set PubMed preferences, create and maintain two bibliographies, as well as keep track of collections of PubMed items. For more information about My NCBI, please refer to a brief, two-page handout.
  2. Click here for help with registering.

    Logging into your My NCBI account: For assistance with signing in and out of My NCBI, click here.

  3. Create a My Bibliography in My NCBI: My Bibliography provides you a tool for keeping track of your publications, whether they are found in PubMed or not. Journal articles, meeting abstracts, presentation, books, book chapters, and patents can be included as part of My Bibliography.
  4. Tutorial: Creating a My Bibliography in My NCBI (4 minutes)

  5. The last piece is to link your eRA Commons account with your My NCBI account. Do this by logging into My NCBI and clicking on Preferences, then Linked Accounts.  You should see eRA Commons listed as an organization. Click on the link to log into eRA Commons then the Save button, which will link the two accounts together.

Linking the two accounts together provides you with a tool to manage your compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy. Your My Bibliography will have a dollar sign ($) in the View section. Clicking the dollar sign ($) will provide you with each article’s compliance status.

Take a look at our guide on complying with the NIH Public Access Policy. The guide outlines the necessary four steps for compliance as well as incorporates frequently asked questions and other helpful resources to help you get familiar with the NIH Public Access Policy.

  • Have questions about the NIH Public Access Policy? Contact Andrea Lynch.

Library Workshop: Advanced EndNote

May 19, 2010

Below are links for the Advanced EndNote educational session held May 19th from 10-11:30 am in the Graff Library computer lab.

  • EndNote Support page — This page links you to updated output styles. Go here before you start modifying an output style to fit your needs.
  • EndNote Web — Access EndNote from wherever you are with this Web-based version. EndNote Web allows you to online search, Cite While You Write, create groups to organize your references, and share your groups with your collaborators. A handout is available that outlines and displays the basic features and functionality. There is also an online tutorial on basic EndNote Web.
  • EndNote X3 — EndNote X3 is the current version of this citation management software. There is a tutorial available that covers a number of aspects of the desktop program:
    • Setting preferences
    • Online searching
    • Creating groups
    • Cite While You Write features and functionality

Library Workshop — Introduction to EndNote

May 18, 2010

Below are links for the Introduction to EndNote session held today, May 18th, from 1-2:30 pm in Graff Library computer lab.

  • Library guide on citation management software.
  • EndNote X3 — EndNote X3 is the current version of this citation management software. There is a tutorial available that covers a number of aspects of the desktop program:
    • Setting preferences
    • Online searching
    • Creating groups
    • Cite While You Write features and functionality
  • EndNote Support page — This page links you to updated import filters, connection files, and output styles. Go here when the references are not importing correctly, you can’t connect to your favorite database, or your output style is not listed.

Eat, Drink, and be… in the Library

May 17, 2010

Several library users have commented recently that the library’s ban on food and drink was inconvenient, because they had to pack up their materials and leave the building to get a snack or cup of coffee.  We understand that our users often need to work through mealtimes, and it’s hard to be productive with a growling stomach.  So, we are now allowing food and drinks in the library.  Go ahead—bring in your coffee and snacks—but we do have a few requests:

  • Please be careful with food and drinks around the computers.  No one wants to use a sticky keyboard, and liquids and electronics don’t mix well.
  • Please clean up any messes (notify library staff of major spills or possible computer damage), and put all trash in wastebaskets.  With a  nod to the National Park Service, practice leave-no-trace library use.

We hope this new policy makes it easier for you to use the library.  As always, we welcome your comments, either here on the blog or via our feedback form.  Please let us know what you think.


New Director, Library Services – Janet Crum

May 13, 2010

I am delighted to join City of Hope as your new library director.  I earned my MLS from the University of Washington in Seattle and have been a health sciences librarian since 1996, when I began working at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland.  I worked in a variety of areas there, including systems, cataloging, managing electronic resources, reference, and administration.  My professional interests are diverse but centered on two interdependent areas:

  • Ensuring that the library and its resources meet the needs of users and are as user-friendly as possible
  • Ensuring that the library is a positive, supportive, intellectually stimulating workplace where staff can both enjoy and excel in their work

On a more personal note, I grew up in Northern California and am very happy to be back in my home state.  When I’m not working, I enjoy gardening, traveling, and spending time with my husband and son, not necessarily in that order.  I’m looking forward to exploring Southern California and growing all the wonderful plants that would never survive a Portland winter.

I’m also looking forward to getting to know my new colleagues here at City of Hope.  I want to talk with stakeholders throughout the organization to learn how you use the library, what the library does well, and how we can better meet your needs.  Please feel free to share your thoughts, either here on the blog, via phone (x68614) or email (jcrum), or in person.  I’d love to hear from you!