AAMC News and Leadership Announcements, 2012 October 10

The current issue of AAMC News and Leadership Announcements includes the following stories that may be of particular interest at City of Hope:

The 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday was awarded jointly to Robert J. Lefkowitz, M.D., and Brian K. Kobilka, M.D., “for studies of G-protein-coupled receptors.” Dr. Kobilka is professor and chair of molecular and cellular physiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He is a former postdoctoral fellow at Duke in Dr. Lefkowitz’s laboratory. Dr. Lefkowitz is a professor of biochemistry, immunology and medicine at Duke and also a basic research cardiologist in the Duke Heart Center. He was awarded the AAMC Award for Distinguished Research in the Biomedical Sciences in 1990 (then known as the Baxter Award).  Both researchers have received strong support from NIH over the years.
http://today.duke.edu/2012/10/lefkowitznobel
http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2012/october/nobel-kobilka.html
http://tinyurl.com/9nky5cf

The National Cancer Policy Forum of the Institute of Medicine has published a workshop summary, “The Informatics Needs and Challenges in Cancer Research.”
http://tinyurl.com/8lwunx3

The new issue of Nature features a report from a June National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) workshop convened “to discuss how to improve the methodological reporting of animal studies in grant applications and publications.”  According to the Nature summary, “The main workshop recommendation is that at a minimum studies should report on sample-size estimation, whether and how animals were randomized, whether investigators were blind to the treatment, and the handling of data.”  The authors of the summary write, “We recognize that achieving a meaningful improvement in the quality of reporting will require a concerted effort by investigators, reviewers, funding agencies and journal editors. Requiring better reporting of animal studies will raise awareness of the importance of rigorous study design to accelerate scientific progress.”
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v490/n7419/full/nature11556.html

The AAMC web site now features a recording of last month’s AAMC webcast featuring Dr. Scott E. Page, the Leonid Hurwicz Collegiate Professor of Complex Systems, Political Science, and Economics, at the University of Michigan and author of “The Difference: How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools and Societies.” The 90-minute session highlighted Dr. Page’s research on the role of diversity in organizational performance as they apply to academic medicine. Dr. Marc Nivet, AAMC Chief Diversity Officer, facilitated the dialogue with Dr. Page, helping to raise our community’s collective intelligence around diversity and inclusion. Dr. Claire Pomeroy, Chief Executive Officer of UC Davis Health System, UC Davis Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences, Dean of the School of Medicine, and member of the AAMC Board of Directors, offered framing remarks.
http://livewebcast.net/aamc/091712

[Note: I believe Dr. Page is scheduled to speak at City of Hope early in 2013]

The Mount Sinai Medical Center and U.S. News & World Report recently co-sponsored a “Summit” to discuss the U.S. News’ annual “Best Hospitals” rankings and their value to consumers and the institutions they evaluate. Hospital leaders and editors from U.S. News & World Report explored a broad range of ways in which the methodologies could continue to be improved. Possible improvements that were discussed include risk adjustment for socioeconomic factors and projected health outcomes, measurement of scientific and medical innovation, clinical trial participation, investment in and use of cutting-edge information such as genomics, and overall patient experience. Video of the event has been posted on the web. Last year, Mount Sinai and U.S. News held the first ever summit to analyze the U.S. News rankings of medical schools.
http://www.mountsinai.org/about-us/newsroom/usn-summit.

The Science Times section of Tuesday’s New York Times focused on “The Digital Doctor,” and included about a dozen related articles.
http://tinyurl.com/987bwms

Our colleagues at Public Responsibility in Medicine & Research (PRIM&R) have scheduled three webinars in the weeks ahead:
+Thursday, October 18, 1:00-2:30 PM ET — Research Involving “Edge” Populations: Ethical and Regulatory Considerations. Cynthia Gómez, PhD, and Julia Gorey, JD, will discuss the complex ethical and regulatory issues that can arise in research involving “edge” populations, including the homeless, substance abusers, and/or HIV-positive subjects.
http://www.primr.org/Conferences.aspx?id=15979
+Thursday, October 25, 1:00-2:30 PM ET — Update from the Department of Justice. Representatives from the National Institute of Justice will give an overview of DOJ research-related activities, highlighting the data storage policies and privacy and confidentiality protections the DOJ has put in place.
http://www.primr.org/Conferences.aspx?id=16066
+Tuesday, November 13, 1:00-2:30 PM ET — Children in Clinical Research: Stakeholder Perspectives, Ethical Challenges, and IRB Strategies. Victoria Pemberton, RNC, MS, CCRC, and Yoram Unguru, MD, MS, MA, FASPHO, will discuss the ethical guidelines and regulations governing pediatric research, the NIH’s “Children and Clinical Studies” campaign, and practical strategies to assist investigators and IRBs with evaluating children’s participation in research.
http://www.primr.org/Conferences.aspx?id=16047

The full list of announcements is below.

—–

The 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday was awarded jointly to Robert J. Lefkowitz, M.D., and Brian K. Kobilka, M.D., “for studies of G-protein-coupled receptors.” Dr. Kobilka is professor and chair of molecular and cellular physiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He is a former postdoctoral fellow at Duke in Dr. Lefkowitz’s laboratory. Dr. Lefkowitz is a professor of biochemistry, immunology and medicine at Duke and also a basic research cardiologist in the Duke Heart Center. He was awarded the AAMC Award for Distinguished Research in the Biomedical Sciences in 1990 (then known as the Baxter Award).  Both researchers have received strong support from NIH over the years.
http://today.duke.edu/2012/10/lefkowitznobel
http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2012/october/nobel-kobilka.html
http://tinyurl.com/9nky5cf

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday heard oral arguments in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin (UT), an important case regarding diversity at American colleges and universities. The AAMC earlier submitted an amicus brief in the case.
http://tinyurl.com/9glut39

The National Governors Association (NGA) has made available a template and toolkit for analyzing the financial impact of  Medicaid expansion on each state. The materials were prepared by Manatt Health Solutions in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the State Health Reform Assistance Network.
http://www.statenetwork.org/resources/

The New York Times on Tuesday reported, “A shift last year by the Social Security Administration to limit access to its death records amid concerns about identity theft is beginning to hamper a broad swath of research, including federal government assessments of hospital safety and financial industry efforts to spot consumer fraud. For example, a research group that produces reports on organ-transplant survival rates is facing delays because of the extra work it must do to determine whether patients are still alive.”
http://tinyurl.com/98fcz4j

An article in the Des Moines Register discusses the impact of possible budget cuts on the research mission of the University of Iowa.
http://tinyurl.com/9trsz6x

The HHS Office of Inspector General on Tuesday released a report regarding health care fraud titled, “Types of Providers Involved in Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program Cases.” The report found that in 2010 medical facilities or durable medical equipment suppliers represented about 40 percent of subjects of criminal cases. Over one-third of the 2,339 subjects of civil cases in 2010 were hospitals and medical facilities.
http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-12-820

The Institute of Medicine on Wednesday released a report on “Future Uses of the Department of Defense Joint Pathology Center Biorepository.”  In 2005, the Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommended that the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology be closed and its biorepository transferred to the newly created Joint Pathology Center. In this report, the IOM “proposes a series of protocols, standards, safeguards, and guidelines that could help to ensure that this national treasure continues to be available to researchers in the years to come, while protecting the privacy of the people who provided the materials and maintaining the security of their personal information.”
http://tinyurl.com/937gwyh

The 2012 Science of Eliminating Health Disparities Summit will be held Wednesday, October 31 to Friday, November 2, 2012 at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, MD, in suburban DC. The meeting is being organized by NIH, through the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, and in collaboration with other NIH institutes and centers and other federal agencies. The theme of the meeting is, “Building a Healthier Global Society: Integrating Science, Practice, and Policy.”
http://www.nimhd.nih.gov/summit_site/

The National Cancer Policy Forum of the Institute of Medicine has published a workshop summary, “The Informatics Needs and Challenges in Cancer Research.”
http://tinyurl.com/8lwunx3

An Institute of Medicine panel on Tuesday released a new report, “Monitoring HIV Care in the United States: A Strategy for Generating National Estimates of HIV Care and Coverage.”
http://tinyurl.com/9aq74l8

The new issue of Nature features a report from a June National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) workshop convened “to discuss how to improve the methodological reporting of animal studies in grant applications and publications.”  According to the Nature summary, “The main workshop recommendation is that at a minimum studies should report on sample-size estimation, whether and how animals were randomized, whether investigators were blind to the treatment, and the handling of data.”  The authors of the summary write, “We recognize that achieving a meaningful improvement in the quality of reporting will require a concerted effort by investigators, reviewers, funding agencies and journal editors. Requiring better reporting of animal studies will raise awareness of the importance of rigorous study design to accelerate scientific progress.”
http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v490/n7419/full/nature11556.html

The AAMC web site now features a recording of last month’s AAMC webcast featuring Dr. Scott E. Page, the Leonid Hurwicz Collegiate Professor of Complex Systems, Political Science, and Economics, at the University of Michigan and author of “The Difference: How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools and Societies.” The 90-minute session highlighted Dr. Page’s research on the role of diversity in organizational performance as they apply to academic medicine. Dr. Marc Nivet, AAMC Chief Diversity Officer, facilitated the dialogue with Dr. Page, helping to raise our community’s collective intelligence around diversity and inclusion. Dr. Claire Pomeroy, Chief Executive Officer of UC Davis Health System, UC Davis Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences, Dean of the School of Medicine, and member of the AAMC Board of Directors, offered framing remarks.
http://livewebcast.net/aamc/091712

The Boston Globe on Wednesday reported, “Cambridge Health Alliance, which has been seeking a partnership with a financially stronger hospital system for two years, said Tuesday that it has entered exclusive talks with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston about a potential affiliation.”
http://tinyurl.com/9ndoyb4

The Mount Sinai Medical Center and U.S. News & World Report recently co-sponsored a “Summit” to discuss the U.S. News’ annual “Best Hospitals” rankings and their value to consumers and the institutions they evaluate. Hospital leaders and editors from U.S. News & World Report explored a broad range of ways in which the methodologies could continue to be improved. Possible improvements that were discussed include risk adjustment for socioeconomic factors and projected health outcomes, measurement of scientific and medical innovation, clinical trial participation, investment in and use of cutting-edge information such as genomics, and overall patient experience. Video of the event has been posted on the web. Last year, Mount Sinai and U.S. News held the first ever summit to analyze the U.S. News rankings of medical schools.
http://www.mountsinai.org/about-us/newsroom/usn-summit.

The Science Times section of Tuesday’s New York Times focused on “The Digital Doctor,” and included about a dozen related articles.
http://tinyurl.com/987bwms

The Sacramento Bee reported on Tuesday that Dignity Health (formerly known as Catholic Healthcare West) and the fifth-largest health system in the U.S., “reported net income of $132.5 million for its fiscal year ended June 30 – a steep decline from more than $900 million the previous year. Dignity pointed to a soft economy, lower volume, continued underpayments from government payers and a weak investment market.”
http://tinyurl.com/8qkjb4t

The New York Times on Wednesday featured an article on new styles of care that are filling the void caused by the closure of St. Vincent’s Hospital in Greenwich Village two years ago. The article reported that the expansion of physician practices, urgent care centers and traditional clinics “might be the future of urban medicine.”
http://tinyurl.com/8j7cd9h

Our colleagues at Public Responsibility in Medicine & Research (PRIM&R) have scheduled three webinars in the weeks ahead:
+Thursday, October 18, 1:00-2:30 PM ET — Research Involving “Edge” Populations: Ethical and Regulatory Considerations. Cynthia Gómez, PhD, and Julia Gorey, JD, will discuss the complex ethical and regulatory issues that can arise in research involving “edge” populations, including the homeless, substance abusers, and/or HIV-positive subjects.
http://www.primr.org/Conferences.aspx?id=15979
+Thursday, October 25, 1:00-2:30 PM ET — Update from the Department of Justice. Representatives from the National Institute of Justice will give an overview of DOJ research-related activities, highlighting the data storage policies and privacy and confidentiality protections the DOJ has put in place.
http://www.primr.org/Conferences.aspx?id=16066
+Tuesday, November 13, 1:00-2:30 PM ET — Children in Clinical Research: Stakeholder Perspectives, Ethical Challenges, and IRB Strategies. Victoria Pemberton, RNC, MS, CCRC, and Yoram Unguru, MD, MS, MA, FASPHO, will discuss the ethical guidelines and regulations governing pediatric research, the NIH’s “Children and Clinical Studies” campaign, and practical strategies to assist investigators and IRBs with evaluating children’s participation in research.
http://www.primr.org/Conferences.aspx?id=16047

Charles L. Rosen, M.D., Ph.D., has been named chair of the West Virginia University Department of Neurosurgery. Dr. Rosen has been serving as interim chair of the department since September 2011. He joined the faculty at WVU in 2001 and has held various positions in the department since that time, including vice chair, director of research and the neurosurgical research laboratories, director of cranial base surgery and program director for residency in neurological surgery. Dr. Rosen succeeds Julian Bailes, M.D., who left WVU last year to become the chairman of the neurosurgery program at NorthShore University HealthSystem in Evanston, Ill., and a professor at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine.
http://tinyurl.com/8cmvm4z

Darlene F. Saporu, Ph.D., has joined Loyola University Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine as Assistant Dean of Diversity in September 2012. Prior to her position at Stritch, she worked at The Ohio State University from 2005 to 2012 where she executed strategic diversity initiatives for the Graduate School, Office of Diversity and Inclusion and Project Comprehensive Equity at Ohio State/NSF ADVANCE.

Tony Mazzaschi
AAMC

PS: Feel free to email <cas@aamc.org> if you have a problem accessing any article or resource mentioned in this summary. Also, have colleagues email <cas@aamc.org> if they would like to receive these news postings. We also welcome news tips and corrections.

PPS: Other news, policy, and innovation products from AAMC may be of particular interest to subscribers:
+AAMC STAT (Short, Topical and Timely), a weekly news email highlights news related to academic medicine
http://www.aamc.org/newsroom/aamcstat/aamcnews.htm (note subscription box on right)
+AAMC Washington Highlights, a weekly summary of legislative & regulatory developments affecting academic medicine
http://www.aamc.org/advocacy/washhigh/subscribe.htm
+AAMC Second Opinion, news and perspectives from AAMC’s Chief Public Policy Officer
Subscribe by emailing: SecondOpinion@aamc.org
+Wing of Zock, a blog about innovation and change in medical schools and teaching hospitals
http://wingofzock.org/ and its Twitter feed @wingofzock
+AM Express, the journal Academic Medicine’s free monthly issue announcement service
Subscribe by emailing: acadmed_online@aamc.org

PPPS: The AAMC is on both Twitter and Facebook. Access details are available at:
http://twitter.com/aamctoday
http://www.facebook.com/aamctoday

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